NEWSLETTER


Upcoming Event

THE NEXT STAGE Webinar Series Episode 1: Creation in Isolation - Adversity meets Innovation

WAA_ep1.jpg
Taiwan Academy in Los Angeles partners with Western Arts Alliance (WAA) to present six webinars titled as “THE NEXT STAGE: Essential Issues in Performing Arts Creation, Presentation, and Engagement” starting from April, 2021. The first webinar, “Creation in Isolation - Adversity meets Innovation,” will take place at 4 PM PST on April 26th via Zoom with LIVE QA. Cheng Tsung-lung (Artistic Director, Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan), Farooq Chaudhry (Executive Producer, Akram Khan Company), and Aditya Prakash (Artist, Aditya Prakash Ensemble) are invited to talk with moderator Chris Lorway (Executive Director, Stanford Live) and to share how to transform the challenges into innovation of their creations during the pandemic. Welcome to join at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/creation-in-isolation-adversity-meets-innovation-tickets-150077246083.

Concert by Taiwan’s National Symphony Orchestra Premieres Virtually in LACMA's Sundays Live

newsletter_LACMA_(c)TEY_TAT_KENG_01.jpg
Sundays Live of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) will present a virtual concert by the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) from Taiwan! Its premiere will take place online at 6:00 PM PST on May 2nd, 2021, free for worldwide audiences. Conducted by Shao-Chia Lü, the NSO will perform 4 works by Taiwanese composers, including Tyzen Hsiao’s “The Angel from Formosa,” Yu-Shian Deng’s “Bang Chhun Hong (Longing for the Spring Breeze)” (arr. by Tyzen Hsiao), Ching-Mei Lin’s “Song of Reverberant Emerald,” and I-Uen Wang Hwang’s “Hakka Fantasy.” Welcome to register at https://www.lacma.org/event/sundays-live-taiwan-philharmonic-national-symphony-orchestra.

"Taiwan in Dialogue” Lecture Series Featuring Chi Ta-wei and Tsai Ming-liang

簡報1.jpg
The 3rd event of UCLA “Taiwan in Dialogue” series will be live at 6:00 PM PST on May 6th, 2021 via Zoom. Entitled “The Membranes and Queer Literature in Taiwan,” the event will bring together the writer Chi Ta-wei and translator Ari Larissa Heinrich to share the classic queer speculative fiction The Membranes with the audience, as well as its influence on the history of queer literature in Taiwan. This event will feature short lectures by Professors Chi and Heinrich, followed by a dialogue with Michael Berry, Director of UCLA Center for Chinese Studies (CCS). Welcome to register at https://ucla.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aMA3Q746TxuKBqou_dooKA.

One of the great cinematic poets of our era, Tsai Ming-liang will join the 4th event of UCLA “Taiwan in Dialogue” series at 7:00 PM PST on May 19th, 2021 via Zoom with Michael Berry. Director Tsai has created the most enduring visual masterpieces of the past thirty years, from Vive L’Amour (1994) to The Hole (1998), and from Goodbye, Dragon Inn (2003) to Days (2020). His works have been awarded numerous top prizes at international film festivals. Welcome to register at https://ucla.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_f4-JDurgQh-ZiQnAVbikVw.

DIRECT TO TAIWAN at CAAMFest 2021

caamfest.jpg
Four Taiwanese films will be featured in DIRECT TO TAIWAN at CAAMFest 2021 from May 13th to 23rd, 2021! One of the two feature films “Taipei Suicide Story” is an emotional and impactful film that reveals a picture of life and death. It was in the official Cinéfondation selection of the 2020 Cannes Film Festival and it swept 3 top awards at 2021 Slamdance Film Festival. The other feature film “Radio! Ready Oh!” is a comedy about a crazy battle arisen by a radio station facing bankruptcy. Moreover, two short films will be presented. One is “Kurushio Current” that depicts a 30-year-old Taiwanese who works in the U.S, facing the struggles and conflict feelings about his family and hometown. “Swingin’” is a dramedy/music film about a boy having gay dads being bullied in school. For further information, please follow CAAMFest’s website: https://caamedia.org/blog/category/caamfest-2021/.

Ongoing Event

Welcome to visit “After Hope” Exhibition in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

《Peony》Isa Ho.jpg
Taiwan Academy in Los Angeles is collaborating with the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco to present “After Hope: Videos of Resistance,” which explores the role of hope in contemporary art and activism, running through December 2021. Three outstanding Taiwanese artists and their video works are invited, including Isa Ho's “Peony,” Guang-Ming Yuan’s “The 561st Hour of Occupation,” and Kuang-Yu Tsui’s “Stay Calm.”

Isa Ho (b. 1977; Keelung, Taiwan), strongly influenced by her previous experience in oil painting, creates narrative-rich artworks that challenge documentary styles. Her artwork reveals the conflict between the individual and society, using digital techniques to constantly reconstruct reality. In “Peony,” Ho juxtaposes two different images of Asian women. One is a Kunqu actress in traditional Chinese costume and the other a Korean K-pop singer. She uses her work to rethink the role and position of women in contemporary society, in relations to the unique development of popular culture. For more information, please visit https://la.us.taiwan.culture.tw/information_141_125746.html.

Welcome to visit “Treasures in Gold & Jade: Masterworks from Taiwan” at the Bowers Museum

FotoJet (4).jpg
“Treasures in Gold & Jade: Masterworks from Taiwan”, co-presented by the Taiwan Academy in Los Angeles and the Bowers Museum, is now on display until September 5th, 2021. This exhibition showcases 44 elegant gold and jade artworks by Taiwanese artists Wu Ching and Huang Fu-Shou. For more information, please visit https://la.us.taiwan.culture.tw/information_141_126225.html.

Wu Ching’s Reminiscences of Rustic Pleasures (above right) includes over 500 ants and various insects. The ants’ “home” is constructed by bronze branches, silver soil and ten ant colonies. Besides the spawning queen and worker ants protecting her, there are also ants responsible for foraging, transporting, parenting, building and guarding.

In Rescued from Desperation (above left), Huang Fu-Shou skillfully operates a piece of rigid jade to its limit and uses the jade’s full range of color to carve this elegant works. It features a plant breaking through the surface of a rectilinear, man-made form, illustrating both the damage that we are doing to nature and its resiliency to human’s concrete world. It symbolizes that life will still be alive after breaking through all the difficulties.



Newsletter Archive :

返回頂端
關閉選單
Keywords: 文化部
fb youtube mail